Should Those Who Smell Bad Be Told

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Should Those Who Smell Bad Be Told? Once while working in a large company, I saw that the new leader of our function had all kinds of lipstick on her teeth. No one told her. A colleague of mine said out loud, ‘she doesn’t have any friends.’ That was one of the saddest things I ever saw or heard. There are other similar situations where someone has salad in their teeth, zipper unzipped etc. Somehow the topic of body odor is especially sensitive because it speaks to a perceived personal failing, and that failing is that you do not wash properly nor are acquainted with personal care products that can manage the ‘stank’. Some people have sensitive skin or allergies. Others slept late, ran out of deodorant, or just having a bad day. In this article from the Australian Daily Mail, the issue is discussed in at least a semi-serious way. We are sensitive to the topic here at SwampButt Underwear and have garments that will help manage the sweat that leads to stank.
It’s one of those social taboos where everyone has come across at least one person who smells but dares not say anything directly to them — or even suspected that they themselves are emitting an odour so hideous it’d kill an entire colony of cockroaches.
Instead, it becomes a rant on Facebook or the topic of water cooler conversation — all the while the culprit is oblivious to the odour permeating from their body.
It can strike anywhere. On the train, on planes, at the gym, in the checkout queue, and even at work.

Gwen Stefani told fans they smelled 'gross'. Should Those Who Smell Bad Be Told
Gwen Stefani once told fans they smelled ‘gross’. Should you be emboldened by her?

With a heightened sense of smell thanks to pregnancy hormones, I know I am in for a treat if the past few weeks are anything to go by.
And as the mercury creeps even higher it’s inevitable that I will be reaching for the breath mints in a desperate bid to trick my nose into smelling something other than someone else’s dry sweat.
But sometimes there is no escaping it.

Anyone who has been crammed in a train carriage or in a packed elevator knows the smell all too well. It’s eye-watering, nostril-burning stuff that you are terrified will transfer on to you. Worse still, as you stand there gasping for air while trying not to breathe through your nose, you desperately hope that no one thinks its radiating from you.Which got me thinking. Does the person who stinks know they stink and is it acceptable to point it out to them?A friend told of running late for his four-hour flight back to Sydney to the point he was the last to board with just minutes to take off.It was only after he disembarked and was met at the airport by his parents and brother — and his brother pulled out of a hug shouting the words “eww bro you stink” that he wondered why the woman next to him on the plane did not even acknowledge him.In high school after sports classes all the girls used to spray themselves with Impulse in a bid to mask the musk — but that’s when you got that vomit-inducing mix of sweat and sweet.While most people think their sh*t doesn’t stink, I’d like to think that if mine did someone would tell me. I even carry a spare roll of deodorant in my handbag just in case.
Lillian Saleh is day editor for The Sunday Telegraph 
 Here is the entire article:

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/rendezview/should-you-tell-someone-they-stink/news-story/aa73232a124f9b098f0bbce0d4ca92e2